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Welcome to the Ukrainian Studies Program
at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor!

  • Discover the world of hidden treasures of the thousand-year-old Slavic culture
  • Visit remarkable places of the second largest country in Europe
  • Be a part of Ukrainian transition

After it declared its independence on August 24, 1991, Ukraine has been rapidly earning its rightful place on the map of the world. Learning the Ukrainian language will give you the opportunity to acquaint yourself firsthand with the fascinating country and hospitable people.

Testimonies of former students:

sdfv"The beauty of the Ukrainian language is perhaps surpassed only by its fragility. Just as the Ukrainian people have struggled to preserve their borders and self-identity from the ambitions of their neighbors, so too has the Ukrainian language endured the threat of assimilation. Indeed, the Soviet era's prohibition of Ukrainian in many parts of Ukraine brought the language to the brink of irrelevance. Yet as a testament to Ukraine's conviction, Audrey and Christian, UofM Ukrainaian students , 1996-1998Ukrainian today remains a vital and evolving language that is asdspoken by tens of millions of people around the world. Most asdprofoundly, however, the Ukrainian language is much more asdthan a combination of words and grammatical conventions. asdRather, it is both the means by which the Ukrainian story asdmay be most vividly retold, while itself remaining the asdimportant part of that story. Those who have traveled to asdUkraine will likely confirm that Ukrainians speak of their asdlanguage as most peoples speak of their nation's music or asdart. As its student, you too will come to appreciate the asdUkrainian language as a thing of beauty, expression and asdpassion."


-- Christian and Audrey Iwasko
University of Michigan Ukrainian Students, 1996-1998

 

 

 

This website was created by Svitlana Rogovyk and Serhiy Sychov as part of the CREES/LRC/Slavic Department Language Teaching Material Development Project. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 2002/03.
Speacial thanks to Holly Furgason for technical support and friendly advice.

 
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

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